Nose, Osaka

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Nose

能勢町
Town
Flag of Nose
Flag
Location of Nose in Osaka Prefecture
Location of Nose in Osaka Prefecture
Nose is located in Japan
Nose
Nose
Location in Japan
Coordinates: 34°58′N 135°25′E / 34.967°N 135.417°E / 34.967; 135.417Coordinates: 34°58′N 135°25′E / 34.967°N 135.417°E / 34.967; 135.417
CountryJapan
RegionKansai
Kinki
PrefectureOsaka Prefecture
DistrictToyono
Government
 • MayorKazuhiro Naka
Area
 • Total98.68 km2 (38.10 sq mi)
Population
 (October 1, 2016)
 • Total9,971
 • Density100/km2 (260/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+09:00 (JST)
City hall address28 Shukuno, Nose-chō, Toyono-gun, Osaka-fu
563-0392
Websitewww.town.nose.osaka.jp

Nose (能勢町, Nose-chō) (Japanese pronunciation: [nose]) is a town situated in Toyono District, Osaka Prefecture, Japan.

As of October 2016, the town has an estimated population of 9,971 and a density of 100 persons per km² (262/sq mi). The total area is 98.68 km² (38.1 sq mi).

"Noma Keyaki" in Nose

Nose is noted for the "Noma Keyaki", a 1,000-year-old Keyaki tree, 25 m tall (82 ft), 11.95 m (39.2 ft) trunk circumference.[1]

History[edit]

People lived in Nose area in the Jomon Period, (ca. 10,000 BCE – ca. 300 BCE). Nose's ancient name is Kusaka Village. It is mentioned in the Nihon Shoki, completed in 720 CE.[2]

In 1837, there was an important peasant revolt in Nose, in the context of the Tenpō famine (1833-1839), some months after Ōshio Heihachirō’s riot.[3]

Geography[edit]

Nose is surrounded in all directions, including Mount Miyama (791m)[4] and Mount Kenpi (784m). Besides, many streams, Yamabe, Hitokuraohroji, Noma and Tajiri Rivers flow in the Inagawa River basin, and Katsura River also flow in the town.

Transportation[edit]

Rails[edit]

No train stations locate at Nose. The nearest station is Yamashita Station, Kawanishi, Hyōgo.

Roads[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Osaka Toyono County: Noma Keyaki (in Japanese; google translation)
  2. ^ "Sightseeing Spots | Nose Town Tourism & Local Products". www.town-of-nose.jp. Retrieved 2020-05-02.
  3. ^ J. Newmark, Yamadaya Daisuke’s 1837 Nose Movement, Early Modern Japan: An Interdisciplinary Journal v. 22 (2014), p. 8-28
  4. ^ "Nose Town Tourism & Local Products". www.town-of-nose.jp. Retrieved 2020-05-02.

External links[edit]